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FAQ

Updated COVID-19 Information:

Due to the current extraordinary conditions surrounding the COVID-19 global pandemic we have instituted a strict one family in the Farm Shop at a time for your safety and our safety.  Much as it pains us as farmers we have also implemented limits on purchases in an attempt to serve as many in our community as possible at this time.  As of May 6, 2020our beef supply is limited, and we do not expect our next beef back from the processor until after Memorial Day.  Our Pork sausage selection is well stocked at the moment, pork cuts are very limited.  Lamb selection is limited.  If you need recipes to stretch what you have just ask Catherine or Ginny, not Farmer Jeff.

We also offer eggs(limit 2 dozen per family), chicken will be limited, and cheese is available.   If you need recipes to stretch what you have just ask Catherine or Ginny, not Farmer Jeff.

We have had a large influx of new customers and in an effort to serve as many people as possible we have placed product limits.  We regret any inconvenience this may cause; COVID-19 has sent us more customers than anticipated, when we began planning last year for the 2020 season.

Q:  Which farmer’s markets do you attend?

A:  Walnut Hill Farm attends markets in: Fredericksburg,  Warrenton, Dale City,

NOTE DUE TO THE COVID SOCIAL DISTANCING RULES THE ONLY MARKET WE ARE ATTENDING AS OF MAY 2020 IS WARRENTON AS A DRIVE THROUGH MARKET.  WE HOPE FREDERICKSBURG WILL OPEN SOON. WE HAVE NO ESTIMATED OPENING DATE FOR DALE CITY AT THIS TIME MAY 6, 2020

 

Q:  Is Walnut Hill Farm Certified Organic?

A:  Walnut Hill Farm is not certified organic for two very important reasons.  First the organic certification process does not have a mandate for animals to be pastured.  Chickens can be raised in climate controlled factory houses and qualify for organic.  Cattle can be raised in feedlots knee deep manure, fed organic corn and qualify as organic beef.  Secondly, the cost of certification is greater than we are willing to undertake and pass on to our valued customers.

 

Q:  Why is the pasture component so import?

A:  The pasture component is extremely important to animal behavior.  Cows have a forage requirement to survive; grain is not necessary for the survival of the cow.  The pig also needs to be outdoors or in a pen that does not have a concrete floor so that they can root and wallow, while teaching their piglets to become pigs.  Let them eat dirt so to say.

 

Q:  Do you have products other than what you bring to the Farmer’s Market?

A:  Yes, at the farm store the product selection is larger and more varied than at the market.

 

Q: Is it cheaper to buy at the farm store?

A:  No, But, you can visit with the animals to see where the eggs come from, or watch your bacon develop over time (Ha, Ha).  And with luck late in the afternoon once everyone has returned from the farmers market there may be an opportunity to watch the animals being fed or gather the afternoon eggs.

 

Q: What can be seen on a farm visit?

A:  The answer varies with the seasons.  Young animals are best seen in the spring, as the cows, pigs, and sheep, give birth March to May.  If your interest is eggs, you can visit with the Red Star chickens, and watch the Toulouse Geese at work.  The other heritage breeds that can be seen at various times depending where you stroll will be; American Milking Devon cattle, Hog Island Sheep, Tamworth pigs.  You may also see some industry standard animals.  We also have a Jersey cow to provide milk for the family.